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Program Schedule

North American Forest Insect Work Conference – May 22-26, 2006Asheville, NC


The Program for the 2006 NAFIWC consists of 26 workshops that are organized within five “tracts:” Invasive Insects (INV), Management and Silviculture (MGT), Scale and Interactions (SCA), Change (CHA), Direct Tactics in Forest Insect Management (TAC), and Biodiversity and Natural Heritage (BIO). Following are the specific topics for each of the tracts along with the moderator(s) and the general daily schedule for the workshops. Plenary Addressees are being negotiated and will be posted once we receive confirmation from the speakers.

NAFIWC Program Tracks:

* Please click on the topic title to see/hide the list of speakers

A. Invasive insects (INV)

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Topic Moderators
1 Invasives and forest community structure.

Rieske-Kinney


INV 1

  Invasive insects and forest community structure.
Moderator:

Lynne Rieske-Kinney, University of Kentucky

Abstract:

Biotic and abiotic disturbance plays an integral role in ecosystem function, driving ecological succession and shaping forest structure. Recently natural disturbances have exceeded their historic range of variability with respect to frequency, intensity, and magnitude in response to climate change, fragmentation, and exotic species introductions. Forest resources are at the forefront of these fluctuations as exotic species become established and new hosts of endemic pests evolve. Our speakers will identify critical issues influencing the magnitude and extent to which endemic and exotic invasive insects function as landscape engineers across a range of ecosystems, and predict strategies to mitigate their impact, thereby increasing forest sustainability.

Speakers:

Tom Coleman and Lynne Rieske-Kinney, University of Kentucky: A changing landscape: Predicting future forests following catastrophic losses to southern pine beetle and associated disturbance.

John Young, US Geological Survey: Modeling stand vulnerability and biological impacts of the hemlock woolly adelgid.

Mary Arthur, University of Kentucky: Interacting effects of geological substrate and an invasive scale (beech bark disease) on tree species composition and nitrogen cycling.

Deb McCullough, Michigan State University: Rising from the ashes: What might we see after EAB

Robert Coulson, Texas A&M University, and Lynne Rieske-Kinney, University of Kentucky: Discussion: Critical issues for mitigation of invasive forest insects.


2 Sirex noctilio in North America - a new arrival.

Don Duerr/Dennis Haugen


INV 2

  Sirex noctilio in North America - a new arrival.
Moderator:

Don Duerr, USDA Forest Service, FHP; Dennis Haugen, USDA Forest Service, FHP

Abstract:

An established population of Sirex woodwasp was discovered during 2005 in upstate New York. During the first half of the workshop the panel will present the status of Sirex woodwasp in North America, its biology and ecology, detection and delimit surveys, management options, and research needs. The second half of the workshop will consist of a moderated discussion.

Speakers:

Leon Bunce, USDA APHIS

Peter deGroot, Natural Resources Canada

Don Duerr, USDA Forest Service, FHP

Dennis Haugen, USDA Forest Service, FHP.

Brian Kopper, USDA APHIS

Nathan Schiff, USDA Forest Service, SRS


3 Pathways of invasiveness.

Dave Kulhavy


INV 3

  Pathways of Invasiveness.
Moderator:

David L. Kulhavy, Stephen F. Austin State University

Abstract:

This workshop will examine: pathways of invasive insect species in and out of North American forests, methods of export and import of insect pests from North America, impacts of exported pests (as compared to effects in their native areas). A discussion will include proactive measures, detection methods and needed areas of research. A final summary will include a plan of dealing with invasive forest insects.

Speakers:

Dr. Robert Mangold, USDA Forest Service, FHP

Dr. Jianghua Sun, Chinese Academy of Science


4 Managing exotic insects.

Bernie Raimo


INV 4

  Managing Exotic Insects.
Moderator:

Bernie Raimo, USDA Forest Service

Abstract:

Many jurisdictions must recognize newly arriving exotic insects as soon as they appear while at the same time they have decreasing resources to accomplish this task. Early detection and identification are crucial to maintaining a full range of management options, yet this is often logistically difficult to do. Effectively allocating scarce financial and human resources to manage new forest insects can be challenging to plan and implement. This workshop will highlight powerful new technologies- DNA analysis, hyperspectral remote sensing, and GIS decision support- that can assist forest health specialists and land managers to help meet these important needs.

Speakers:

Nathan Havill, Yale University: Molecular methods to reveal the introduction history of exotic species.

Jen Pontius, USDA Forest Service: New ways remote sensing can help manage forest insect pests.

Ben Hachin, Redstart Forestry Inc.: How GIS can foster collaboration and efficiency in protecting our forests.


5 International cooperation.

N. Gillette/D. Cibrian


INV 5

  Firewalls in the Forest: International Strategies for Combating Invasives.
Moderator:

Nancy Gillette, USDA Forest Service, PSW and David Cibrián Tovar, Universidad Autónoma Chapingo

Abstract:

This workshop will provide a global perspective of strategies for invasives. Representatives from Asia, Europe, and the Americas will present regional strategies for combating invasives. Rob Mangold will describe the challenges and approaches that the US is taking, and Jianghua Sun will describe the current situation in China. Alain Roques will talk about the E.U.'s approach (DAISIE – Delivering Alien Species Inventories in Europe). Rodolfo Campos Bolaños will present examples of work in Mexico, and John Rawlins will describe faunal surveys in the Caribbean/Central America to establish baseline data for detection of invasives. Finally, Keith Douce will present an overview of the Bugwood website and database, an example of how a global digital image network can integrate management of invasive species.

Speakers:

Rob Mangold, USDA Forest Service: US strategy.

Alain Roques, INRA: Europe strategy.

Jianghua Sun, Chinese Academy Sciences: Asia strategy.

R. Campos Bolaños, Universidad Autónoma Chapingo: Mexico strategy.

John Rawlins, Carnegie Museum, Caribbean/ Central America strategy.

Keith Douce, University of Georgia: Bugwood global resource.


6
Quantitative approaches to understanding insect invasions in forests. Patrick Tobin

INV 6

  Quantitative Approaches to Understanding Insect Invasions in Forests.
Moderator:

Patrick C. Tobin, USDA Forest Service, NRS

Abstract:

Exotic insects are a threat to biodiversity and resources in forests, and consequently can be an important force of change. Upon arrival, they exist at low densities, complicating detection. Their establishment and spread can be difficult to assess due to limited information, which complicates implementation of management tactics. Quantitative approaches to understanding insect invasions in forest systems have been a particularly successful application of mathematical ecology to the development of effective management strategies. This workshop will highlight lessons learned from quantitative assessments of gypsy moth invasion in North America, and then quantitatively address the invasion dynamics of other exotic pests.

Speakers:

Patrick Tobin, USDA Forest Service, NRS: Introduction.

Sandy Liebhold and Patrick Tobin, USDA Forest Service, NRS: Population processes that drive the gypsy moth's invasion of N.A.

Alan Sawyer, USDA-APHIS-PPQ: Infestation dynamics of the Asian longhorned beetle in the urban forest landscape.

Timothy Menzel, T. Evan Nebeker and Michael Caprio, Mississippi State University: The relationship between forest landscape

features and the occurrence of imported fire ants in Mississippi forests: An application of Bayesian model averaging.

Jean-Claude Grégoire and Marius Gilbert, Free University of Brussels: Mass-foraging for unpredictable resources: a possible

explanation for Allee effects in Ips typographus.


 

B. Management and silviculture(MGT)

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Topic Moderators
7 Different perspectives on silviculture.

Jim Guldin/K. Gottschalk


MGT 7

Different perspectives on silviculture: Large scale applied silvicultural assessments under HFRA.

Moderator:

Jim Guldin and Kurt Gottschalk, USDA Forest Service

Abstract:

The Healthy Forest Restoration Act was passed in December 2003, and provides statutory processes to restore healthy forest & range conditions on public and private ownerships. Six titles in HFRA apply to different public and private forest ownerships in the US, of which Title IV, Insect Infestations and Related Diseases, includes provisions for research and monitoring activities on Federal lands. Two sections in Title IV have special interest to foresters, entomologists, and pathologists. Section 403, Accelerated Information Gathering, authorizes professionals to plan, conduct, and promote information gathering on forest insects and diseases, to help resource managers develop treatments to improve forest health, and to disseminate results. Section 404, Applied Silvicultural Assessments (ASA's) goes farther in that it provides for information gathering and research, for field studies on Federal land, for administrative studies, research studies, or special pest management projects, and for cooperation between NFS, R&D, and S&PF in these activities. ASA elements require a study plan, peer review by 'scientific experts', including non-Federal experts, public notice and comment (including 'multiparty monitoring'). Notably, the ASA provides opportunity for categorical exclusion from documentation in an EA or EIS for treatments within a limit of 1000 ac. In this session, practical experience with several of the ongoing ASA's under Section 404 of HFRA will be briefly reviewed, with discussion centered especially on objectives, development, positive outcomes to date, and lessons learned in the implementation.

Speakers:

Doug MacCleery, USDA Forest Service: HFRA and large scale silvicultural assessments.

Jim Guldin, USDA Forest Service, and Robert Coulson, Texas A&M University: Southern Pine Beetle in the West Gulf States.

Mary Ann Fajvan, USDA Forest Service: Thinning hemlock to reduce hemlock woolly adelgid impacts.

Kurt Gottschalk, USDA Forest Service: Gypsy moth and oak decline on the Daniel Boone NF; and Minimizing gypsy moth effects on the Monongahela and Wayne NFs.

Jim Guldin, USDA Forest Service and Fred Stephen, University of Arkansas: Upland oak-hickory forests and the red oak borer in the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas.

Kurt Gottschalk and Jim Guldin, USDA Forest Service: Discussion.


8 Silviculture and pest management.

Rose-Marie Muzika


MGT 8

Silviculture and pest management: Predictions, expectations and consequences.

Moderator:

Rose-Marie Muzika, University of Missouri-Columbia

Abstract:

Regardless of the objective, any silviculture practice has consequences that may be intended or otherwise.   With management objectives specific to minimizing damage from insect pests or directly affecting the insect's reproduction or life cycle, desired outcomes may result. The expected outcomes likely do not occur in isolation, however. Predicted changes in populations of hosts or insects create unintended consequences for other ecosystem components. Modification of stand structure or ecosystem processes may exacerbate stand level damage by positively influencing other problematic insects, or by interfering with cycles of natural enemies. Evidence suggests that silvicultural approaches may have short term successes, but these may lead to longer term problems.  Contrary evidence also exists. Furthermore, an assessment of 'successes' of silviculture require years, if not decades. 

This session reviews some long term experimental approaches and assessments, as well as unexpected effects of silviculture directed at reducing insect populations.  Additional considerations to be addressed include implications for fuel accumulation and wildfire risks, determining appropriate management scale, distinctions among forest insect guilds and corresponding management approaches. Finally, it is critical to consider dramatic differences in silvicultural strategies that may be necessary for native versus non-native forest insect pests.

Speakers:

Rose-Marie Muzika, , University of Missouri-Columbia:  Introduction.

Kurt Gottschalk, USDA Forest Service:  Fifteen-year response of oak-dominated forests to gypsy moth and thinning.

Gaétan Moreau, Canadian Forest Service:  Large-scale thinning treatments and their unexpected consequences on insular populations

of eruptive defoliators.

Jan Volney, Canadian Forest Service:  Revisiting Scipio's ghost at Zama: The spruce budworm silviculture problem.

Rose-Marie Muzika, , University of Missouri-Columbia:  Discussion.


9 Trade-offs in managing forests.

John Spence


MGT 9

  Biodiversity vs. productivity and other trade-offs associated with sustainable forest management.
Moderator:

John R. Spence, University of Alberta, and W. Jan A. Volney, Canadian Forest Service.

Abstract:

This workshop/discussion session is intended to promote a discussion of trade-offs involving biodiversity and also relevant to development of sustainable forest management (SFM). We will prime the discussion with a short description of the EMEND (‘Ecosystem Management Emulating Natural Disturbance’, http://www.emend.rr.ualberta.ca/english/homepage_e.html) Experiment, located in northwestern Alberta, Canada and which attempts to provide data required for a cogent analysis of these trade-offs. The discussion will explore alternatives for formal analysis of the trade-offs involved in the SFM approach and techniques to designate optimal solutions, once trade-offs are understood well enough to be specified. Potential application of the Net Environmental Benefit Analysis (NEBA) and other approaches will be discussed with the hope of helping us solve our particular problems with the EMEND data set and also stimulating a broader conversation. The organizers welcome short presentations on this theme if arranged in advance through the contacts above.

Speakers:

Discussion led by Spence and Volney.


 

C. Scale and interactions(SCA)

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Topic Moderators 
10 Symbiosis.

Rich Hofstetter


SCA 10

   Symbiotic relationships and their role in forest insect invasion and success
Moderator:

Richard Hofstetter, Northern Arizona Universit

Abstract:

Many economically significant forest pest insects have tight symbiotic relationships with microbes (e.g., fungi, bacteria, protozoa). The success and impact of these insects can often be attributed to their symbiotic partners. In this session, we will describe symbiotic relationships of several important forest pest species in North America and Africa, and address the role of symbioses in insect invisibility, management, and control.

Speakers:

Nadir Erbilgin, University of California-Berkeley: How symbioses between an invasive exotic pathogen and native bark beetles may influence the success of all involved.

Eric Ott, Louisiana State University: Symbiosis in the invasive ambrosia beetles Xylosandrus crassiusculus and Xyleborus glabratus: Implications for management."

Kier Klepzig, USDA Forest Service and Young-Min Kang & Cetin Yuceer, Mississippi State University: Proteomic and microscopic examination of the southern pine beetle-fungus symbiosis.

Doug Stone, Mississippi State University: Morphology of the mesonotal mycangium of Xylosandrus mutilatus.

Brett Hurley, FABI, University of Pretoria: Symbiosis between Sirex noctilio, Amylostereum areolatum and Deladenus siricidicola: A South African perspective.

Ken Raffa, and Yasmin Cardoza, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Brian Aukema, Canadian Forest Service: Multiple component symbioses facilitate invasion of variable habitats: Host colonization by spruce beetle - microbe associations as a model.


11

The roles of habitat mosaics and physical variables in movement of forest-dwelling organisms.

Brian Strom


SCA 11

  The roles of habitat mosaics and physical variables in the movement of forest-dwelling organisms.
Moderator:

Brian Strom, USDA Forest Service

Abstract:

Forests are diverse environments composed of a mosaic of habitat types, including differences in physical as well as biotic factors. It is likely that habitat type affects the behavior and movement of forest-dwelling organisms, but quantitative measurements of these interrelating variables are in their infancy. This workshop aims to expose participants to techniques for quantifying the physical environment and relating environmental variables to movement behaviors of insects. Speakers will describe experiments in which the physical environment was quantified and related to stand variables and movement of pheromone surrogates to predict insect behavior. Additional speakers will describe how models of insect dispersal can be adapted to the habitat mosaics common in forests.

Speakers:

John D. Reeve, Southern Illinois University

Harold Thistle, USDA Forest Service

Mary Reid, University of Calgary

Sandy Liebhold, USDA Forest Service


12 Connecting the Scales: From Molecular through Landscape.

Ken Raffa


SCA 12

  Connecting the scales: From molecular through landscape.
Moderator:

Ken Raffa, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Abstract:

Linking pattern and process across multiple scales is a major challenge confronting forest management. This session will consider approaches and technologies for forging connections from the biochemical through landscape levels. Emerging issues such as invasive species, global change, and fire-insect, forest-human, and wilderness-managed interactions, share the common problem that information from one level is not immediately applicable to another. Hence devising informed strategies is hindered. We will explore three systems that are eruptive, sensitive to human activities, and models for related insects. For each, three speakers will analyze the system at one level, and propose approaches to interfacing their knowledge with adjoining scales.

Speakers:

Ken Raffa, University of Wisconsin-Madison: Introduction.

Jorg Bohlman, University of British Columbia: Mechanisms of interaction.

Allan Carroll, Canadian Forest Service: Mountain pine beetle: Population dynamics.

Barbara Bentz, USDA Forest Service and Jim Powell, Utah State University: Landscape ecology


13 Insect-plant interactions. L. Rieske-Kinney /Erbilgin

SCA 13

  Host plant-mediated plant-insect and insect-insect interactions.
Moderator:

Lynne K. Rieske-Kinney, University of Kentucky and Nadir Erbilgin, University of California-Berkeley

Abstract:

Interactions between multiple herbivores and their host trees become increasingly complex when considering that each individual organism subsequently affects the overall interaction. The horizontal relationships that develop from the interactions of multiple stressing agents function synergistically or antagonistically, facilitating or impeding the frequency and quality of subsequent relationships. Neither herbivore nor plant response is static, and the cross-effects of these interactions are complex. Speakers in our session will evaluate (a) spatially and temporally segregated inter-guild interactions, because these multiple interactions affect the likelihood and intensity of subsequent interactions, and (b) contemporary views of plant defense mechanisms, highlighting emerging information on insect and microorganism-induced biochemicals and semiochemicals.

Speakers:

Lynne Rieske-Kinney, University of Kentucky: Woody plant galls effect foliar quality with potential consequences for herbivory.

Dan Quiring and Rob Johns, University of New Brunswick: Influence of intracrown heterogeneity in foliage quality on foraging behaviour and performance of caterpillars.

Nadir Erbilgin, University of California, Berkeley; Paal Krokene and Erik Christiansen, Norwegian Forest Research Institute; Gazmend Zeneli and Jonathan Gershenzon, Max Planck Institute: Exogenous application of methyl jasmonate elicits defenses in Norway spruce (Picea abies) and reduces colonization by the bark beetle Ips typographus.

Pierliugi Bonello, Ohio State University: The nature and ecological implications of disease resistance in pine.


 

D. Change(CHA)

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Topic Moderators
14
Challenges of using on-line resources to aid in forest entomology education.

Fred Hain/John McLean


CHA 14

  Challenges of using on-line resources to aid in Forest Entomology Education.
Moderator:

Fred Hain, North Carolina State University, and John Mclean, University of British Columbia

Abstract:

Greatly increased amounts of information are readily available at the finger tips of today's instructors and students. Library resources are on-line as are the publications of federal and state institutions in the US and national and provincial institutions in Canada and Mexico. Web search engines enable us to find information and images on nearly everything we can imagine. This panel will report on some sources of this information, the challenges in managing it and its application in forest entomology education. Discussion of advantages/disadvantages of on-line resource use is welcome. The special problems associated with distance education courses will be highlighted.

Speakers:

Keith Douce, University of Georgia: Bugwood 2006 – tools to support forest entomology and forest health education.

Dave Kulhavy, Stephen F. Austin State University: Face-to-face professor and the distance learning

Clyde Sorenson, North Carolina State University : ‘Insects and People': Emulating a dynamic classroom online.

John McLean, University of British Columbia: Reflections on a decade’s experiences with on-line forest entomology teaching resources.


15 Global change and bark beetle outbreaks.

Tom Eager /Bill Mattson


CHA 15

  Global warming: A conversation about management issues and responses.
Moderator:

Tom Eager, USDA Forest Service, FHP, and Bill Mattson, USDA Forest Service, NRS

Abstract:

Global climate change has been a constant in the evolutionary history of the earth’s biosphere. Before the advent of modern humans, no single species was able, by itself, to significantly influence this complex climate system. However, with the dawn of the industrial revolution, humans became the first unitary species with the undisputed capacity to influence the world climate. Ever rising levels of tropospheric gases (CO2, O3, etc) have the capacity to the influence the biochemistry of plant-insect, and insect-insect interactions and perhaps more importantly, global climate patterns. For example, extreme drought has affected a six-state area and northern Mexico since 2000, resulting in widespread mortality of piñon pines. The cause of death was most frequently ascribed to Ips confusus and Pityopthorus sp twig beetles. The interaction of below-average precipitation and tree killing insects may provide a model that applies to other systems. This workshop addresses apparent or potential changes in plants, insects, and forests, and the socio-political consequences that likely have their origins in global change.

Speakers:

Bill Mattson, USDA Forest Service

Deb. McCullough, Michigan State University

Richard Flemming Great Lakes Forestry Centre

Matt Ayres, Dartmouth College

Darrell Ross, Oregon State University

Tom Eager, USDA Forest Service


16
Effects of temperature and global warming on population ecology of forest insects. Joe Elkington

CHA 16

  Effects of temperature and global warming on population ecology of forest insects.
Moderator:

Joe Elkinton, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Abstract:

Global warming has already had measurable effects on winter temperatures and length of growing season with major impacts on many important forest insects. These include expansion of geographic or altitudinal ranges, outbreaks caused by changes in voltinism, and exposure of tree species previously inaccessible due to climatic limitation. These changes are likely to accelerate in the coming years and will affect many species.

Speakers:

Jesse Logan, USDA Forest Service, RMRS

Matt Hansen, USDA Forest Service, RMRS

Evan Preisser, University of Massachusetts-Amherst:

Joe Elkinton, University of Massachusetts-Amherst:

Matt Ayres, Dartmouth College:


17 Status of North American bark beetles.

Allan Carroll/Joel McMillan


CHA 17

  Status of North American Bark Beetles: Anthropogenic Impacts to Forest Susceptibility.
Moderator:

Joel McMillin, USDA Forest Service and Allan Carroll, Canadian Forest Service

Abstract:

During recent decades, the size and severity of bark beetle outbreaks in North America has been unprecedented. There is compelling evidence implicating climate change as a causal factor exacerbating population eruptions and impacts. However, landscape-scale bark beetle epidemics require both favorable climate and a profusion of suitable host trees. In many forest types, the distribution and abundance of suitable hosts has been affected by forest management practices including wildfire suppression, selective harvesting and reforestation/afforestation. This session will examine the status of eruptive bark beetle populations in North America and explore the potential role of anthropogenic alterations to forest susceptibility in the numerous large-scale outbreaks.

Speakers:

Alberto Sediles, Universidad Nacional Agraria de Nicaragua: Southern pine beetle outbreaks in Central America: role of forest structure and other factors influencing disturbance regimes in subtropical pine forests.

Tom Eager, USDA Forest Service: Bark beetle outbreaks in ponderosa pine forests and piñon woodlands: role of forest structure and other factors influencing disturbance regimes in the southwestern US.

Steve Taylor, Canadian Forest Service: Effects of altered disturbance regimes on the outbreak dynamics of the primary bark beetles of western Canada.

Brian Aukema, Canadian Forest Service: The mountain pine beetle in British Columbia: role of forest structure and land tenure in the current outbreak.


18 Changing ownerships and fragmentation.

Scott Cameron


CHA 18

  Effects of forest fragmentation and ownership change on forest pests and their management
Moderator:

R. Scott Cameron, International Paper

Abstract:

The forests in North America are rapidly becoming more fragmented, especially in areas near high populations, and land ownership patterns are changing at an astounding rate. The physical attributes associated with these changes are affecting forest ecosystems, insect populations, and their hosts in varying ways, which in turn is resulting in more complex management situations. These changes portend major challenges in the future for forest insect research scientists, forest health specialists, and land owners.

Speakers:

Kurt Riitters, USDA Forest Service: The physical evidence of forest fragmentation: Geographic status and trends.

Andrew “Sandy” Liebhold, USDA Forest Service: The varied effects of habitat fragmentation on forest insect population dynamics.

Albert “Bud” Mayfield, Florida DACS Division of Forestry: Some challenges to managing forest health in a fragmented landscape.

Frank Sapio, USDA Forest Service: Synthesis across varied spatial and temporal scales: Pest management challenges for the future.


 

E. Direct tactics in forest insect management(TAC)

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Topic Moderators
19
Hurdling over obstacles toward implementation of semiochemical-based forest pest mgt. tools.

Chris Fettig/Darrell Ross


TAC 19

  Hurdling Over Obstacles Toward Implementation of Semiochemical-based Forest Pest Management Tools
Moderator:

Christopher Fettig, USDA Forest Service, PSW; Dezene Huber, University of Northern British Columbia; and Darrell Ross, Oregon State University

Abstract:

One of the largest problems with the development of semiochemical-based management tools is that few products arise from such efforts, particularly in reference to bark beetle management. In this workshop, participants will discuss many of the obstacles that impede full registration and utilization of such techniques. Specifically, items that will be discussed include logistic concerns, regulatory and legislative hurdles, proprietary issues, and funding concerns. The product of this session will be recommendations for future research and development efforts that will facilitate more rapid implementation of pheromone-based technologies.

Speakers:

Darrell W. Ross, Oregon State University: MCH and the Douglas-fir beetle experience.

Kevin Thorpe, USDA ARS: Gypsy moth mating disruption research.

Jim Heath, Hercon Environmental: Moving gypsy moth mating disruption products into the marketplace.

Russell S. Jones, EPA: Registration of biopesticides: what are the regulatory and legislative hurdles and how are they overcome?


20 Tree protection.

Steve Munson


TAC 20

  Forest Protection - bark beetles and woodborers.
Moderator:

Steve Munson, USDA Forest Service, FHP

Abstract:

This session will focus on techniques and strategies currently in use for single tree or area wide protection and highlight experimental studies designed to address forest protection issues. This session will include forest protection programs for native and non-native forest insects. Western bark beetles, southern pine beetle and introduced woodborers are the subject areas covered in this session. Topics cover single tree preventative treatments, pheromone applications and sanitation programs currently in use for high value recreation areas in the west, new tools for single tree protection and developing methods for suppressing/eradicating introduced woodborers in the central and northeastern portions of North America

Speakers:

Ken Gibson, USDA Forest Service, FHP: Protecting trees on high-value sites in the West.

Chris Fettig, USDA Forest Service, RMRS: Single tree protection tools for western conifers.

Don Grosman, Texas Forest Service: Systemic insecticide injections for protection of southern and western conifers from

Dendroctonus and Ips bark beetles.

David Lance, APHIS: Developing methods for managing populations of exotic woodborers in North America.


21 Stand level tactics to address forest pest problems.

Ron Billings


TAC 21

  Stand Level Tactics to Address Forest Pest Problems.
Moderator:

Ron Billings, Texas Forest Service

Abstract:

Experienced speakers from across the U.S. will describe current projects related to stand-level manipulations for managing such destructive pests as the emerald ash borer, western bark beetles, and the southern pine beetle. A general discussion of this approach to pest management will follow.

Speakers:

Andrew J. Storer, Michigan Technological University: Modeling the relationship of emerald ash borer and ash phloem, with management implications.

Joel McMillian, USDA Forest Service, FHP (with CJ Fettig, JA Anhold, SM Hamud, RR Borys, CP Dabney, SJ Seybold): The effects of mechanical fuel reduction treatments on the activity of bark beetles infesting ponderosa pine.

Jim Rineholt, Sawtooth NRA: Red and dead trees: Bark beetle protection projects in Idaho

John Nowak, USDA Forest Service, FHP: Southern pine beetle prevention and restoration program: Old way of thinking, new way of working.


22 Treatment Tactic Development and Application.

Brian Strom and Andrew Birt


TAC 22

  Perspectives on Treatment Tactic Development and Application .
Moderator:

Brian Strom and Andrew Birt

Abstract:

Treatment tactics are planned procedures that are used to modify or regulate the distribution and abundance of a pest species. Typically, tactics are directed to ways and means of suppression of an existing pest population or prevention of potential pest population outbreaks. In this workshop we address four aspects of treatment tactic development and application. First we consider an overview of the discovery, development, and registration of a pesticide for use in forestry. Second, we examine the use of ecological modeling for risk assessment. Third we examine the use of termiticides in the urban environment. Fourth, we evaluate the use of trangenics as treatment tactics in the forest environment. We conclude by identifying the critical issues associated with treatment tactic development and application.

Speakers:

James A. Gagne (BASF): An Overview of the Discovery, Development, and Registration of a Pesticide for Use in Forestry.

Andrew Birt (KEL, Texas, A&M University): Use of Ecological Modeling for Risk Assessment

Clark N. Lovelady (SYNGENTA): Termiticides in the Urban Environment.

Brian Strom (USDA Forest Service): A forest entomologists perspective on use of transgenics as treatment tactics in the forest environment.

Discussant: Robert N. Coulson


23
Shaping future forests: Using classical biol. control to reduce harm from invasive forest insects.

S. Salom/M. Montgomery


TAC 23

  Shaping Future Forests: Using Classical Biological Control to Reduce Harm from Invasive Forest Insects.
Moderator:

Scott Salom, Virginia Tech; Michael E. Montgomery, USDA Forest Service, NRS; and Roy Van Driesche, University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Abstract:

Recent invasions into North America show the continued vulnerability of native forests. Future forests could, if invaders are left uncontrolled, differ greatly from their historical composition. Classical biological control is sometimes the best or only option for reducing the damage to forests caused by non-native insect pests. We will focus on a spectrum of programs, ranging from past and recent success to ongoing and developing efforts.

Speakers:

Joe Elkinton, University of Massachusetts-Amherst: Winter moth: Yesterday and today.

Tim Paine, University of California-Riverside: Biological control of invasive pests on an introduced forest tree.

Scott Salom, Virginia Tech: Status of biological control efforts for HWA.

Roger Fuester, USDA, ARS, BIRL: EAB and ALB.

Nathan Schiff, USDA Forest Service, SRS: Sirex wood wasp.


24 Challenges to biological control. Fred Hain

TAC 24

  Challenges to Biological Control
Moderator:

Fred Hain, North Carolina State University

Abstract:

There are many challenges to the successful application of biological control programs, and some may question the logic of this approach. The purpose of this workshop is to address some of the issues surrounding biocontrol. The moderator will open with a “devil’s advocate” statement and then ask selected experts in the field, and the audience, to respond. Issues to be addressed include the nature of foreign explorations, the suitability of a pest for biocontrol, impacts on non-targets, predicting the likelihood of natural enemy establishment outside its native range, factors that should be considered in post-release evaluation, and incorporating the natural enemy into an IPM program.

Speakers:

Wayne Berisford, University of Georgia

Mike Montgomery, USDA Forest Service, NRS

Scott Salom, Virginia Tech

Fred Stephen, University of Arkansas Ron Van Driesche, University of Massachusetts-Amherst


25 Decision support tools.

Randy Hamilton


TAC 25

  Decision support tools.
Moderator:

Randy Hamilton, USDA Forest Service, RSAC

Abstract:

The increasing number and magnitude of invasive and native forest insect outbreaks make it ever more difficult to assess the impact of these pests and implement effective management strategies. Technological advances provide valuable, but underutilized, decision support tools that can help entomologists and resource managers better understand and manage these pests. Tools include remote sensing (satellite imagery, radar), geographic information systems (GIS), and other geospatial and non-geospatial technologies. Applications include monitoring insect impact, predicting spread, assessing biological control impacts, studying spatial dynamics, delineating insect habitat, and others. This session highlights applications of geospatial and other technologies in forest entomology.

Speakers:

Jaime Villa Castillo, CONAFOR: The use of remote sensing techniques to survey forest pest and diseases in Mexico.

James Ellenwood, USDA Forest Service: Near real-time orthorectified imagery for rapid assessment of forest damage.

Jeffrey Holland, Purdue University: Statistical tools for examining the influence of landscapes on forest insects.

Amos Ziegler, Michigan State University: Data life-cycle and decision support framework for large-scale pest management.


 

F. Biodiversity and natural heritage(BIO)

#

Topic Moderators
26 Natural forests/ indigenous trees.

Mike Wagner/Jorge Macias


BIO 26

  Ecosystem complexity in altered forests: influences on biodiversity, trophic interactions and pest damage.
Moderator:

Michael Wagner, Northern Arizona University and Jorge Macias-Samano, ECOSUR

Abstract:

Forests around the globe are modified by human activities and natural disturbances. Their alterations usually result in reduced complexity and biodiversity of the forest matrix. Such ecosystem changes can profoundly alter the biodiversity of other species in the forest and change the interactions between trees and insect pests. In this workshop the participants will examine forest alterations including conversion of natural forest to plantation, selective harvesting, stand density modification and experimental variation in overstory biodiversity. How these forest alterations then change the community structure and richness of key insect species such as carabids and ants, trophic interactions and status of insects as pests will be presented. Relationships from a range of temperate and tropical forest ecosystems and representing several different countries will create an opportunity to examine broad patterns of how forest ecosystem alterations affect forest insects.

Speakers:

Sky Stephens and Michael Wagner, Northern Arizona University: Overstory diversity and land use practices: Impacts on biodiversity.

Gaetan Moreau, Dan Quining and Christen Bjorkman, Université de Moncton: Trophic interactions in altered and frequently disturbed ecosystems: lessons from thinned forests and short relation coppice plantations.

Timothy T. Work, Université du Québec à Montréal: Effectiveness of variable retention for maintaining arthropod diversity in eastern and western boreal forests in Canada.

Jorge E. Macias-Samano, ECOSUR: Planting native or exotic trees? Implications on pest management in the American tropics.

Paul P. Bosu and Michael R. Wagner, Northern Arizona University: Mixed native species plantation models to manage forest insect pests.


27 Endangered species.

Bob Haack


BIO 27

  Endangered species
Moderator:

Bob Haack, USDA Forest Service, NRS

Abstract:

There are hundreds of threatened and endangered plant and animal species recognized by governments worldwide. For example, there are 745 species of plants and 555 species of animals (including 45 insects) that are on the federal list of threatened and endangered species in the US. Forest insects are tightly linked to many of these T&E species, or are themselves listed as T&E species. For example, some protected plants require specific insect pollinators; some protected animals rely on insects as food; biocontrol efforts can negatively impact protected non-target species; and forest management activities can directly or indirectly impact T&E insect species. This workshop will address some of the T&E issues related to (a) possible non-target impacts that result from the release of natural enemies and (b) the role of insects as food for protected bird species.

Speakers:

Bob Haack, USDA Forest Service, NRS: Introduction.

Tim Paine, University of California-Riverside: Assessing the risk of releasing biocontrol agents for eucalyptus borer control on the endangered elderberry borer.

Dylan Parry, SUNY: Trouvelot’s Legacy? The disappearance of giant silk moths in northeastern North America.

Jim Hanula, USDA Forest Service, SRS: The endangered red-cockaded woodpecker: diet, prey distribution, and forest management impacts on prey.

Nathan Schiff, USDA Forest Service, SRS: What do you feed an ivory-billed woodpecker?


28 Cultural/ Non-traditional resources. Steve Clarke

BIO 28

  Cultural/ Non-traditional resources.
Moderator:

Steve Clarke

Abstract:

Forest insect outbreaks and IPM programs have consequences that extend beyond their effects on the target pest. The focus of this session is the impacts of forest insect outbreaks and/or forest health prevention and suppression treatments on cultural traditions and resources or non-traditional forest products. Speakers will address a wide variety of topics illustrating the far-reaching effects of forest pest problems and solutions.

Speakers:

Richard Baird, Mississippi State University: Fleshy fungi in the southern Appalachians and the impact of forest tree pests on their diversity.

Percival Cho, Ministry of Natural Resources, Belize: Insect induced stand replacing disturbance: The effects on eco-tourism in the Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve, Belize.

Jim Chamberlain and Gary Kauffman, USDA Forest Service: Potential and possible impacts of insect infestations on conservation of medicinal plants.

Stephen Clarke, USDA Forest Service: I got dem ol’ beetle bug blues again, Mama, or how forest insects influence modern music.


Mon– 22


14:00-19:00

Registration

15:00- 17:00

Associated Meetings – WFIWC and SFIWC Business Meetings

17:30- 19:00

Mixer


Tue – 23


08:00-08:15

Welcome and logistics – Bob Coulson, Kier Klepzig, Rusty Rhea

08:15-08:30
Legislative Perspectives – Representative Charles Taylor
08:30-08:50
Musical Performance

08:50- 10:00

Plenary – Forces of Change: National and State Perspectives
– Ann Bartuska, Rob Mangold, Ron Billings

10:00- 10:30

Break

10:30- 12:00

INV 1

BIO 26

SCA 10

TAC 19

12:00- 13:30

Lunch

13:30- 15:00

INV 2

BIO 27

SCA 11

TAC 20

15:00- 15:30

Break

15:30- 17:00

INV 3

BIO 28

SCA 12

TAC 21

 

Wed – 24


08:30- 10:00

Plenary – Forces of Change: International and Academic Perspectives
- Werner Kurz, Mike Wagner, Fred Hain

10:00- 10:30

Break

10:30- 12:00

INV 4

CHA 14

SCA 13

TAC 22

12:00- 13:30

Lunch

13:30- 15:00

INV 5

CHA 15

MGT 7

TAC 23

15:00- 15:30

Break

15:30- 17:00

INV 6

CHA 16

MGT 8

TAC 24

17:30- 18:15
Associated Meetings – WFIWC Founder’s Award Address – Bill Ciesla
18:30- 20:30
Banquet – Guest Speaker (TBA)
 

Thu – 25


08:30- 10:00

Forces of Change: Regional, CSREES and Industrial Perspectives
- Pete Roussopoulos, Rick Meyer, Scott Cameron

10:00- 10:30

Break

10:30- 12:00

CHA 17

CHA 18

MGT 9

TAC 25

12:00- 13:30

Lunch

13:30- 15:30

Critical Issues in Forest Entomology – A Panel Discussion: Patrick Tobin, Jim Guldin, Ken Raffa, Allan Carroll, Scott Salom, Mike Wagner

16:00- 17:00

Associated Meetings – WFIWC Business Meeting

Invited Plenary Speakers (confirmed in bold):

Rob Mangold, Rick Meyer, Pete Roussopoulos, Ann Bartuska, Scott Cameron, Ron Billings, Fred Hain, Mike Wagner.

 


Robert N. Coulson
   Texas A&M University

 
  Contact for Program
    Suggestions:
    Kier Klepzig
    USDA Forest Service

Fred Hain
   N.C State University

Rusty Rhea
   John Nowak
   USDA Forest Service
 


 

 

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